One Indian Girl – Chetan Bhagat

OneIndianGirlRating: 5*****

Published: October 1st 2016 by Rupa Publications India

Synopsis: Hi, I’m Radhika Mehta and I’m getting married this week. I work at Goldman Sachs, an investment bank. Thank you for reading my story. However, let me warn you.
You may not like me too much. One, I make a lot of money. Two, I have an opinion on everything. Three, I have had a boyfriend before. OK, maybe two.
Now if all this was the case with a guy, one might be cool with it. But since I am a girl these three things I mentioned don’t really make me too likeable, do they?


The cover isn’t impressive and attractive, but the story, oh, my…Absolutely LOVEDit!

I read the reviews on Goodreads before choosing to order the book (there’s only one book in the library across the whole country, well, better than none at all 🙂 and it was available for requests) and the reviews at first glance are terrific with only one star ratings! These were sort of bad, readers commenting how this book was a waste of time, didn’t reach the expectations, characters were not great, but THANKFULLY, I absolutely enjoyed the writing style, the characters and episodes made me lough within the first 50 pages! So, yep, READ IT!

I think, perhaps, this book is written for anyone and those Indian readers who live outside the India itself, to understand the essence of it, without pressure of society norms and whom liked or disliked something.

So, what’s this is about? Why I enjoyed? Because it represented the Indian culture, the way of thinking, the issues, the situations representing exact speech – when you can picture the plot taking place like in a movie and it was interesting, intense, moving. The plot is about Indian female who successfully and determination finds herself topping the class, the uni and achieving the best results, lands an offer abroad and goes for it. It also touches typical issue, where young aren’t understood at home, being a little different from the majority of family members, not aiming to get married straight away, not even thinking of marriage in the next few years, and definitely not the way Indian arranged marriages are, because mum hasn’t understood her the whole life and what worse could happen having chosen whom to marry by those, same parents!?

The book touches several topics/issues – young, top professionals in their field, feminism – but in a discussion way with the characters, personal ego-centrism, love, loneliness, relationships, family expectations and pressure, cheating, and main character’s Radhika’s personal development.

It’s a book that successfully jungles family pressure of reaching higher scores in tests/being a topper in the class and once reaching that, facing another pressure – marriage, fighting through a lot of drama, typical blackmailing and going for personal aim – be someone successful. I think it represents a wide range of population. Radhika is one of the many who lives successfully abroad, who is in relationship and lives together, but her own family thinks she is someone who couldn’t even handle a date with a guy…

I love the story because it represented well all the characters and their ego’s, the moments when we have something but we don’t value them to see we are actually enjoying this one minute. I think the reader gets a mix of blend personalities, the novel seems realistic, fast-moving and finished within hours. What else – READ, READ IT!

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The Hat House by Tina Wijesiri

TheHatHouseRating: 5*****

Published: January 31st 2018

I received this e-book for an honest review, thank you!

The Hat House is a lovely children picture book which tells about three little hedgehogs finding their home and meeting new friends. The story is light and entertaining, each of the watercolor illustrations represents the plot that has been read just now.

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My niece and I enjoyed this cute story.

 

February TO-BE-READ books

Hello in February, what are you currently reading? What do you really want to read during this month? Is there something you have always planned to but never got around to actually pick up? I do notice while browsing and reading other blogs, that February, for those who set themed reading month calendars – are associated with Valentines day and romance books pop up a lot, nice. But what about other themes associated? It’s the last month of winter, does reading winter themed books still counts? I will say yes, as long as you love what you are reading and enjoy. There’s no time frame why one could not read all the winter settings in summer and vice verse. What about idea to set up  specific colors for each month of the year? Then choosing & arranging books to be read accordingly by their cover color, all genres, going through your pile of TBR’s and find surprises that suddenly are discovered by this sort of book arrangement? I think I would love to try this for fun!

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Mine, however, for the FEB, wasn’t really planned – but yes, there are some romance fiction – all of the paperbacks and earc’s received, which I had ordered via library months ago and finally received them and there are e-books – crime fiction + YA! As you can see – the book covers are more orange/yellowish/pink paperbacks, links to Goodreads:

Last night I finished One Indian Girl and absolutely LOVED it, review to come. I read the reviews on Goodreads before while choosing to order the book (there’s only one book in the library across the whole country, well, better than none at all 🙂 and it was available for requests) and they were sort of bad, readers commenting how this book was a waste of time, didn’t reach the expectations, characters were not great, but THANKFULLY, I absolutely enjoyed the writing style,  the characters and episodes made me lough within the first 50 pages! So, yep, READ IT!

The other selection of February read are:

The Girl in the Woods and More Than We Can Tell are my most anticipated new releases (FEB & MARC), I enjoyed all the series with Detective Patrik Hedström and Erica Falck, a Scandinavian setting in Fjällbacka and I am intrigued what’s next, I am sure it will be interesting and score a high rating from me. The ya book by Brigid Kremmerer – excited (!!), I absolutely enjoyed her other novel Letters to The Lost book, which was published last year and it was highly rated.

Miles Away From You is a new YA release as well for March, I am half way through it, it deals with many topics, including depression, “demi” or explores gender nonconformity and the spectrum of sexual preference in an authentic way,  this novel explores love, loss, and the drastic distances we sometimes have to travel in order to move on.

Thank you for reading and that’s all for my FEB TBR plan! Fingers crossed we all read what we plan to read ^^

What I read in January

Hi! In January  I read 6 books and that’s a lot for me, because I didn’t set any expectations of what I might read, the highest possibility was between 1-3, in best case, so I am VERY happy I had a very interesting reading month, e.g. all the books were rated between 4-5 stars and that’s “wow”. I am, of course, hoping the same will happen for February read…

So, I read:

  • Kasey & Ivy” by Alison Huges; will be published in March and my rating is 5*, so I am highly recommending it to read, it is a Middle Grade story and my review will follow on 20/03img_20180111_1829521473004262.jpg

Synopsis: Through twenty-six letters to her friend Nina, twelve-year-old Kasey chronicles the often humorous observations and impressions of her unexpected, month-long stay in a geriatric ward for the treatment of a rare but treatable bone disease (“osteo-something-something-itis”). Kasey tries to make her life less dull by wearing her own nightgowns, surrounding herself with her favorite stuffies and developing an unusual exercise routine. Hospital food, insomnia and the germy communal bath are enduring sources of dread, but some new (and unexpected) friends make her life bearable.


  • Social Media ROI: Managing and Measuring Social Media Efforts in Your Organization by Olivier A. Blanchard My rating is 5*

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The book has been written couple years ago, but it is worth to read and learn, one of the books that focuses on the organizational aspect to achieve ROI goals and objectives. It’s well written, and so interesting! Be ready to read a lot, because the print is small and no huge line spacing.


  • Singapore Noir by Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan & others  My rating is 4*img_20180121_1527011473004262.jpgThe book is a collection of short stories by various authors from Singapore, being related with Singapore, what’s different than the rest of the short stories set in Singapore, these particular represents – the dark side of the city/country, they are specific and may not be for everyone’s taste, but I think it takes a lot to create one story like this by the author to match the authenticity, cultural markings and the use of Singlish in one – you have to be living there for a while to know how much the stories show of cultural beliefs and stigma at the same.

  • Goodbye Europe: Writers and Artists Say Farewell by Various My rating 5*

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Synopsis: From Paris to Prague, from the past to the present, authors and artists say farewell in this unique collection. In these pages you’ll find personal letters, reminiscences, poetry, art and brand new fiction from some of the most talented and important voices at work today, including Jessie Burton, Alain de Botton, Matt Haig, Richard Herring, Owen Jones, Mark Kermode, Robert Macfarlane, Kate Mosse, Chris Riddell, Lionel Shriver and many more. A fascinating, funny and moving must-read for anyone who wants to understand the times we live in, our relationship with the continent, and ourselves.


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Synopsis: It is 1911, and Jean is about to join the mass strike at the Singer factory. For her, nothing will be the same again. Decades later, in Edinburgh, Connie sews coded moments of her life into a notebook, as her mother did before her. More than 100 years after his grandmother’s sewing machine was made, Fred discovers a treasure trove of documents. His family history is laid out before him in a patchwork of unfamiliar handwriting and colourful seams. He starts to unpick the secrets of four generations, one stitch at a time.


TheLyingKind

Synopsis: Six-year-old Lola Jade Harper is taken from her bedroom. Her mother is distraught. She is convinced her estranged husband, Gavin Harper, has abducted their daughter. Detective Rachel Prince is leading the investigation but is soon out of her depth as she searches for the most high-profile missing child in the country. To uncover the truth about Lola’s disappearance, Rachel must untangle the Harper family’s complicated web of secrets and lies. As the case progresses, the body of a local woman is found. The death at first seems unrelated, until a trail of social media posts lead Rachel to a chilling discovery.  And then another little girl is taken… With growing pressure from the public and the appearance of someone from her past she’d rather forget, will Rachel be able to solve the connection between the two missing children and the murder – before it’s too late?


Thank you for reading, how was your reading month? Have you marked any of the books I read during January on your TBR lists? What are you currently reading?

The Lying Kind (Detective Rachel Prince, Book #1) – Alison James

TheLyingKindRating: 5*****

Release date: Previously stated title: “The Missing Child”, February 7th 2018 by Bookouture

Synopsis: Six-year-old Lola Jade Harper is taken from her bedroom. Her mother is distraught. She is convinced her estranged husband, Gavin Harper, has abducted their daughter.
Detective Rachel Prince is leading the investigation but is soon out of her depth as she searches for the most high-profile missing child in the country. To uncover the truth about Lola’s disappearance, Rachel must untangle the Harper family’s complicated web of secrets and lies.
As the case progresses, the body of a local woman is found. The death at first seems unrelated, until a trail of social media posts lead Rachel to a chilling discovery. 
And then another little girl is taken…With growing pressure from the public and the appearance of someone from her past she’d rather forget, will Rachel be able to solve the connection between the two missing children and the murder – before it’s too late?


I received this e-arc from the Bookouture publisher for an honest review, thanks a million!

I love the cover, it’s the first that attracted my attention and then I read the synopsis, which does sound interesting, you won’t deny.

Yes, I place the book as my new favorite and tend to re-read it again. Let me say this first, -it’s well written crime fiction, thankfully, there wasn’t anything too explicit/ nothing gross – detailed explained – none of that style of writing, but I LOVED the book! Why? Because it was smooth, interesting, intriguing, I enjoyed both main detectives – Rachel and her co team pair – Brickall. They both made up a good team, each one of them having contrasting personalities, but they both shared similar analytical mind with different approaches to be used in practice. So it wasn’t the team who always and always agree with each other – that one point as a start to why I enjoyed The Lying Kind.

So the book is about a detective, Rachel, dealing with a case which is handed to her from another team, the incident, well, the crime occur 5 months ago and she, together with her team pal is having “fresh eye” to what might have happened and continuing the investigation of a little girl being snapped from her bedroom while her mother has been sleeping. All leads to the little girl’s dad who’s also missing now, but something does not match up, although, it is very likely to be so, but first they must find him to find the girl…

The book’s synopsis really tells it all, but it is much more than that, there are layers of interesting leads that is investigated through to get the agents somewhere, and how multiple layered case can be, how many dead ends and how bits by bits it is starting to make sense. Detective Rachel’s personality is well build up, she tells a story and she matures through the time within the book, to deal with her own terrible past…Oo, that was completely unexpected and funny to imagine one in real life..

I had to lough out loud when I read the episodes of some particular suspect’s being interviewed, the writer has captured the intonation of the language style how a particular people’s group tend to speak, it was SO clear and I could imagine one speaking!

I am looking forward to read the next books in the series.

The Sewing Machine by Natalie Fergie

img_20180124_1945251473004262.jpgRating: 4****

Published:  April 17th 2017 by Unbound, Kindle Edition

Synopsis: It is 1911, and Jean is about to join the mass strike at the Singer factory. For her, nothing will be the same again. Decades later, in Edinburgh, Connie sews coded moments of her life into a notebook, as her mother did before her. More than 100 years after his grandmother’s sewing machine was made, Fred discovers a treasure trove of documents. His family history is laid out before him in a patchwork of unfamiliar handwriting and colourful seams. He starts to unpick the secrets of four generations, one stitch at a time.


I received this e-arc for an honest review from publisher, thank you!

Absolutely enjoyed this historical mystery fiction, for most of the book I was creating my theories how will it end and what’s going to happen next! Interesting and beautifully written, there was something that reminded me of another book about the time the story took place in the past and at that moment I though, did they know…but of course, this is a historical fiction! All, I am trying to say – this story swallows you to the plot.

The book is about finding discoveries which you were not looking for, how one thing leads to another and how destiny may play a trick, a good one, how many heartbreaks one may have and complete disaster in life, but the main character lifts up and faces coincidences, which, with a little help, finds a way to grand you new reality of secrets that never were meant to be the secrets. I could see the character growth, it slowly builds up for Fred and other characters in each of the time gaps – Jean and Ruth.

This book speaks about Fred finding story behind his family roots, finding himself and what he enjoys the most. Jean finding her home and building life with ongoing belief and investment in her family life, as well, as a character  Ruth – the story takes place in Scotland for each of the time gap. I was a little confused over the time stories and characters, but eventually it clears.

The story is written in time gaps, having chapters set in 1911 and then in 1980 and present. There are many characters and your likes vary between them 🙂 Pick up the book if you are looking for a cozy historical fiction! There’s nothing spooky or 

Thank you for your attention readers, have a good reading month ahead!

 

Singapore Noir by Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan, Colin Goh, Simon Tay, Philip Jeyaretnam, Colin Cheong, Monica Bhide, S.J. Rozan, Lawrence Osborne, Suchen Christine Lim, Ovidia Yu, Damon Chua, Johann S. Lee, Dave Chua, Nury Vittachi

img_20180121_1527011473004262.jpgRating: 4****

Published: 2014 by Akashic Books

I will admit I was not aware what the book is really about, apart from the fact there are many short stories set in Singapore. To my surprise the stories aren’t light and easy to read, these represent the darker shades of the city/capital life what only locals may have heard.

I have been following the news and media to know it still got all the problems other countries are facing, it’s not a country without a crime, but what made me like and appreciate the writers work is – having written a negative story, implementing culture marks and mentality, setting the atmosphere doggy and unpleasant. It’s a book that shows darkness may have various colors and nothing is as it seems.

I won’t say I enjoyed all the stories, some I left unfinished and some read till the end.
Apparently, the “Noir” is a series set for cities across the globe, not sure I will be reading the rest of the series any time soon, but I am sure it would be interesting to read those and have a culture shock, perhaps, and see how various writers from the globe has chosen to represent the city “noir” atmosphere.

If you are looking for something very slightly different, grab the book and read!